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Childhood maltreatment and biomarkers for cardiometabolic disease in mid-adulthood in a prospective British birth cohort: associations and potential explanations

Li, L; Pinto Pereira, SM; Power, C; (2019) Childhood maltreatment and biomarkers for cardiometabolic disease in mid-adulthood in a prospective British birth cohort: associations and potential explanations. BMJ Open , 9 (3) , Article e024079. 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024079. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Research on associations between childhood maltreatment and adult cardiometabolic disease risk is sparse. We aimed to investigate associations between different forms of child maltreatment and mid-adult cardiometabolic markers and whether potential intermediaries could account for the associations observed. SETTING: 1958 British birth cohort. PARTICIPANTS: Approximately 9000 cohort members with data on cardiometabolic markers. OUTCOMES: Adult (45y) cardiometabolic markers (blood pressure, lipids and glycated haemoglobin [HbA1c]). RESULTS: Seventeen per cent of participants were identified as neglected; 6.1%, 1.6% and 10.0% were identified as experiencing physical, sexual and psychological abuse, respectively. Childhood neglect and physical abuse were associated with high body mass index (BMI) and large waist circumference when adjusting for early-life covariates. For neglect, the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) was 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02 to 1.32) and 1.15 (1.02 to 1.30) for general and central obesity, respectively, and for physical abuse, the respective AOR was 1.36 (1.13 to 1.64) and 1.38 (1.16 to 1.65). Neglect was also associated with raised triglycerides by 3.9 (0.3 to 7.5)% and HbA1c by 1.2 (0.4 to 2.0)%, and among females, lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) by 0.05 (0.01 to 0.08)mmol/L after adjustment. For physical abuse, the AOR was 1.25 (1.00 to 1.56) for high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HbA1c was raised by 2.5 (0.7 to 4.3)% (in males) and HDL-c was lower by 0.06 (0.01 to 0.12)mmol/L (in females). Associations for sexual abuse were similar to those for physical abuse but 95% CIs were wide. For psychological abuse, the AOR for elevated triglycerides was 1.21 (1.02 to 1.44) and HDL-c was lower by 0.04 (0.01 to 0.07)mmol/L. Maltreatments were not associated with raised blood pressure. In analyses of potential intermediary factors, several associations attenuated after adjustment for adult lifestyles (mainly smoking and alcohol consumption rather than physical activity) and child-to-adult BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Childhood maltreatments, particularly neglect and physical abuse, were associated with greater adiposity and poorer lipid and HbA1c profiles decades later in adulthood. Associations were modest but independent of early-life factors linked to these outcomes. Findings implicate adult lifestyles as an important intermediary between child maltreatment and outcomes.

Type: Article
Title: Childhood maltreatment and biomarkers for cardiometabolic disease in mid-adulthood in a prospective British birth cohort: associations and potential explanations
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024079
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024079
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
Keywords: cardiometabolic biomarkers, child abuse, child maltreatment, child neglect, cohort study
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10071449
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