UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Perceptual bias reveals slow-updating in autism and fast-forgetting in dyslexia

Lieder, I; Adam, V; Frenkel, O; Jaffe-Dax, S; Sahani, M; Ahissar, M; (2019) Perceptual bias reveals slow-updating in autism and fast-forgetting in dyslexia. Nature Neuroscience , 22 (2) pp. 256-264. 10.1038/s41593-018-0308-9. Green open access

[thumbnail of Sahani_Main_text_revised_for_UCL.pdf]
Preview
Text
Sahani_Main_text_revised_for_UCL.pdf - Accepted version

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Individuals with autism and individuals with dyslexia both show reduced use of previous sensory information (stimuli statistics) in perceptual tasks, even though these are very different neurodevelopmental disorders. To better understand how past sensory information influences the perceptual experience in these disorders, we first investigated the trial-by-trial performance of neurotypical participants in a serial discrimination task. Neurotypical participants overweighted recent stimuli, revealing fast updating of internal sensory models, which is adaptive in changing environments. They also weighted the detailed stimuli distribution inferred by longer-term accumulation of stimuli statistics, which is adaptive in stable environments. Compared to neurotypical participants, individuals with dyslexia weighted earlier stimuli less heavily, whereas individuals with autism spectrum disorder weighted recent stimuli less heavily. Investigating the dynamics of perceptual inference reveals that individuals with dyslexia rely more on information about the immediate past, whereas perception in individuals with autism is dominated by longer-term statistics.

Type: Article
Title: Perceptual bias reveals slow-updating in autism and fast-forgetting in dyslexia
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41593-018-0308-9
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1038/s41593-018-0308-9
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Gatsby Computational Neurosci Unit
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10071374
Downloads since deposit
572Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item