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In vitro dissolution model can predict the in vivo taste masking performance of coated multiparticulates

Keeley, A; Teo, M; Zarina, A; John, F; Manish, G; Ali, R-S; Orlu, M; (2019) In vitro dissolution model can predict the in vivo taste masking performance of coated multiparticulates. Molecular Pharmaceutics , 16 (5) 10.1021/acs.molpharmaceut.9b00060. Green open access

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Abstract

The majority of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are bitter. Therefore, compliance can be a problem where adequate taste masking has not been achieved; this is most problematic in paediatrics. Taste masking is thus a key stage during pharmaceutical development with an array of strategies available to the formulation scientist. Solid oral dosage forms can be taste-masked quite simply by polymer coating, which prevents drug release in the mouth, without unwantedly impairing drug release further down the gastrointestinal tract. At the early stages of pharmaceutical development, an in vitro method for assessment of taste masking is necessary given the lack of toxicological data preventing the use of human taste panels. Currently there is no such tool allowing prediction of taste masking efficiency. In this study, drug dissolution in the context of aversive taste thresholds was proposed as a means to bridge this knowledge gap. Thus, a biorelevant buccal dissolution test was developed in which previously determined taste thresholds in vivo were used to evaluate taste masking efficiency: if drug release exceeded said thresholds, the formulation was deemed to be poorly taste-masked, and vice versa. This novel dissolution test was compared to the USP I (basket) dissolution test, and the biopharmaceutical implications of taste masking were also assessed by performing USP I (basket) dissolution testing in simulated gastric fluid (SGF). Chlorphenamine maleate (CPM), a model bitter BCS class 1 API, was layered onto sugar spheres and taste-masked using polymer coatings. An array of coating technologies were employed and assessed single blinded: two pH independent water insoluble coatings (Surelease®:Opadry® at 8, 12 and 16% weight gain and Opadry EC at 4, 6 and 8% weight gain) and a pH dependent water insoluble reverse enteric coating (developmental fully formulated system based on Kollicoat® Smartseal 100P at 10% weight gain). Both the biorelevant buccal and the USP I dissolution tests were capable of discriminating between both type and level of coating used. However, only the buccal dissolution test was able to provide absolute quantification of the level of taste masking achieved in the context of previously determined taste thresholds, while the USP I test merely provided a relative comparison between the different technologies assessed. When the release data from the buccal test were assessed in parallel to that in SGF, it was possible to predict in vitro optimised taste masking without compromising bioavailability. The fully formulated system based on Smartseal 100P was identified as the most effective coating and Surelease:Opadry the least effective. The developed methodology provides true insight for the formulator, enabling more informed patient-centric formulation decisions, better taste masking and ultimately more effective medicines.

Type: Article
Title: In vitro dissolution model can predict the in vivo taste masking performance of coated multiparticulates
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1021/acs.molpharmaceut.9b00060
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.molpharmaceut.9b00060
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Pharmaceutics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10070931
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