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Whole genome sequencing reveals that genetic conditions are frequent in intensively ill children

French, CE; Delon, I; Dolling, H; Sanchis-Juan, A; Shamardina, O; Mégy, K; Abbs, S; ... Raymond, FL; + view all (2019) Whole genome sequencing reveals that genetic conditions are frequent in intensively ill children. Intensive Care Medicine 10.1007/s00134-019-05552-x. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

PURPOSE: With growing evidence that rare single gene disorders present in the neonatal period, there is a need for rapid, systematic, and comprehensive genomic diagnoses in ICUs to assist acute and long-term clinical decisions. This study aimed to identify genetic conditions in neonatal (NICU) and paediatric (PICU) intensive care populations. METHODS: We performed trio whole genome sequence (WGS) analysis on a prospective cohort of families recruited in NICU and PICU at a single site in the UK. We developed a research pipeline in collaboration with the National Health Service to deliver validated pertinent pathogenic findings within 2-3 weeks of recruitment. RESULTS: A total of 195 families had whole genome analysis performed (567 samples) and 21% received a molecular diagnosis for the underlying genetic condition in the child. The phenotypic description of the child was a poor predictor of the gene identified in 90% of cases, arguing for gene agnostic testing in NICU/PICU. The diagnosis affected clinical management in more than 65% of cases (83% in neonates) including modification of treatments and care pathways and/or informing palliative care decisions. A 2-3 week turnaround was sufficient to impact most clinical decision-making. CONCLUSIONS: The use of WGS in intensively ill children is acceptable and trio analysis facilitates diagnoses. A gene agnostic approach was effective in identifying an underlying genetic condition, with phenotypes and symptomatology being primarily used for data interpretation rather than gene selection. WGS analysis has the potential to be a first-line diagnostic tool for a subset of intensively ill children.

Type: Article
Title: Whole genome sequencing reveals that genetic conditions are frequent in intensively ill children
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00134-019-05552-x
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1007/s00134-019-05552-x
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2019. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Keywords: Critically ill children, Genetics, Genomics, NICU, PICU, Whole genome sequencing
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Renal Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10070649
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