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Adaptive behaviour and quality of life in school-age children with congenital visual disorders and different levels of visual impairment

Bathelt, J; de Haan, M; Dale, NJ; (2019) Adaptive behaviour and quality of life in school-age children with congenital visual disorders and different levels of visual impairment. Research in Developmental Disabilities , 85 pp. 154-162. 10.1016/j.ridd.2018.12.003.

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Abstract

Background Adaptive behaviours are vital skills that allow individuals to function independently and are potentially amenable to behavioural interventions. Previous research indicated that adaptive behaviours are reduced in children and adolescents with severe to profound VI, but it was unclear if this was also the case for children with mild to moderate VI. Aim The aim of the study was to assess differences in adaptive behaviour in children with congenital visual disorders and different levels of visual impairment and their influence on quality of life and everyday strengths and difficulties. Methods and procedures Questionnaires about adaptive behaviour, strengths and difficulties, and quality of life were completed by parents of school-age children with severe-to-profound VI (S/PVI, n = 9, 0.9 logMAR – light perception only), mild-to-moderate VI (MVI, n = 9, 0.1–0.7 logMAR), or typical sight (control, n = 18, −0.3 to 0.1 logMAR). Differences in questionnaire domains by the severity of VI and relationships between adaptive behaviour and quality of life were analysed in general linear models. Outcomes and results The questionnaire ratings indicated reduced adaptive behaviour, more difficulties, and reduced quality of life in children with S/PVI compared to typically-sighted peers. Effects were smaller for children with MVI, but indicated a significant reduction in quality of life compared to typically-sighted children. The effect of visual impairment on quality of life in school was partially mediated by adaptive behaviour. Conclusion and implication Severe congenital visual impairment affects adaptive behaviour in children with verbal abilities in the typical range. This effect is less pronounced in children with mild-to-moderate VI, but still impacts on quality of life, particularly in school.

Type: Article
Title: Adaptive behaviour and quality of life in school-age children with congenital visual disorders and different levels of visual impairment
DOI: 10.1016/j.ridd.2018.12.003
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2018.12.003
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: adaptive behaviour, adolescence, childhood, quality of life, visual impairment
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Developmental Neurosciences Prog
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10069714
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