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Diffuse optical tomography for the detection of perinatal stroke at the cot side: a pilot study

Chalia, M; Dempsey, LA; Cooper, RJ; Lee, C-W; Gibson, AP; Hebden, JC; Austin, T; (2019) Diffuse optical tomography for the detection of perinatal stroke at the cot side: a pilot study. Pediatric Research , 85 pp. 1001-1007. 10.1038/s41390-018-0263-x. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Perinatal stroke is a potentially debilitating injury, often under-diagnosed in the neonatal period. We conducted a pilot study investigating the role of the portable, non-invasive brain monitoring technique, diffuse optical tomography (DOT), as an early detection tool for infants with perinatal stroke. METHODS: Four stroke-affected infants were scanned with a DOT system within the first 3 days of life and compared to four healthy control subjects. Spectral power, correlation, and phase lag between interhemispheric low frequency (0.0055–0.3 Hz) hemoglobin signals were assessed. Optical data analyses were conducted with and without magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- guided stroke localization to assess the efficacy of DOT when used without stroke anatomical information. RESULTS: Interhemispheric correlations of both oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentration were significantly reduced in the stroke-affected group within the very low (0.0055–0.0095 Hz) and resting state (0.01–0.08 Hz) frequencies (p < 0.003). There were no interhemispheric differences for spectral power. These results were observed even without MRI stroke localization. CONCLUSION: This suggests that DOT and correlation-based analyses in the low-frequency range can potentially aid the early detection of perinatal stroke, prior to MRI acquisition. Additional methodological advances are required to increase the sensitivity and specificity of this technique.

Type: Article
Title: Diffuse optical tomography for the detection of perinatal stroke at the cot side: a pilot study
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41390-018-0263-x
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41390-018-0263-x
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License, which permits any non-commercial use, sharing, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, and provide a link to the Creative Commons license. You do not have permission under this license to share adapted material derived from this article or parts of it. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment > Bartlett School Env, Energy and Resources
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10068614
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