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Review of Jason Pobjoy, The Child in International Refugee Law

Alderson, P; (2018) Review of Jason Pobjoy, The Child in International Refugee Law. [Review]. International Journal of Children’s Rights , 26 (4) pp. 837-840. 10.1163/15718182-02604009. Green open access

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Abstract

Today more than half the world’s refugees are children and their numbers appear to rise continually. Child refugees tend to be at the greatest risk not only of lethal danger but also of being neglected by immigration systems. Jason Pobjoy studied the cases of 82 unaccompanied children who were applying to be refugees in Uganda to escape from extreme violence in their homelands. Although not the subject of this book, these children and the atrocities they experienced have inspired it. Dr Pobjoy is a practising barrister in London and he also works at the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford. Questioning why children are so invisible within immigration systems, he was led to examine how the problem arises from gaps and contradictions in international law. Specifically, the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees (UNCR, 1951) and the Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC, 1989) are both necessary to support child refugees adequately. Yet they are rarely combined in administrative and legal cases. Pobjoy’s aim is to demonstrate in practical detail how it is essential and possible to assist child refugees through legal analyses of their cases that combine the two Conventions. He has conducted ‘a comprehensive comparative review of the procedural and substantive obstacles that a child –whether unaccompanied, separated or accompanied – may encounter’ as well as ways to resolve these challenges (p. 3). The research is based on over 2,500 cases, mainly in the major common law countries, UK, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Although most refugees, nearly 90 per cent, are in the Global South, they tend to be allowed into those countries, where their living conditions are the major concern. Pobjoy concentrates on law about access, and how permission or refusal are determined at the point of entry.

Type: Article
Title: Review of Jason Pobjoy, The Child in International Refugee Law
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1163/15718182-02604009
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1163/15718182-02604009
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10067692
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