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Understanding associations of early-life adversities with mid-life inflammatory profiles: Evidence from the UK and USA

Pinto Pereira, SM; Stein Merkin, S; Seeman, T; Power, C; (2019) Understanding associations of early-life adversities with mid-life inflammatory profiles: Evidence from the UK and USA. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity , 78 pp. 143-152. 10.1016/j.bbi.2019.01.016. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: In two cohorts, we aimed to establish associations between early-life adversities and adult inflammation, and whether adult (a) adiposity or (b) socioeconomic disadvantage are key intermediaries. METHODS:In both cohorts (N = 7661, 1958 British birth cohort; N = 1255, MIDUS), information was used on adult inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen and (MIDUS only) interleukin-6 (IL-6)), adiposity and socioeconomic disadvantage, and early-life adversities (neglect, emotional neglect, physical, psychological, sexual abuse and childhood disadvantage). RESULTS: Early-life adversities varied from 1.6% (sexual abuse, 1958 cohort) to 14.3% (socioeconomic disadvantage, MIDUS). Across the two cohorts, associations were consistent for physical abuse, e.g. 16.3%(3.01,29.7) and 17.0%(−16.4,50.3) higher CRP in the 1958 cohort and MIDUS respectively. Associations attenuated after accounting for adult adiposity, e.g. physical abuse (1958 cohort) and sexual abuse (MIDUS, non-white participants) associations were abolished. Some associations attenuated after adjustment for adult socioeconomic disadvantage; e.g. 1958 cohort neglect–CRP associations reduced from 23.2%(13.7,32.6) to 17.7%(8.18,27.2). Across the cohorts, no associations were found for psychological abuse or emotional neglect; associations for childhood socioeconomic disadvantage were inconsistent. CONCLUSIONS: Specific early-life adversities are associated with adult inflammation; adiposity is a likely intermediary factor. Weight reduction and obesity prevention may offset pro-inflammatory related adult disease among those who experienced early-life adversities.

Type: Article
Title: Understanding associations of early-life adversities with mid-life inflammatory profiles: Evidence from the UK and USA
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.bbi.2019.01.016
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2019.01.016
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Child abuse, Neglect, Cohort study, Inflammation, Adiposity, Epidemiology
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10067647
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