UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Ifriqiya and the central Maghreb

Fenwick, C; (2021) Ifriqiya and the central Maghreb. In: Walker, B and Insoll, T and Fenwick, C, (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Archaeology. Oxford University Press: Oxford, UK.

[thumbnail of Fenwick 01_Fenwick-Handbook_final.pdf] Text
Fenwick 01_Fenwick-Handbook_final.pdf - Accepted Version
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 2 November 2022.

Download (539kB)

Abstract

North Africa played a pivotal part in the development of Islamic archaeology as a discipline through the important French excavations at the Qal’a of the Beni Hammad in Algeria in the late 19th century, one of the earliest excavations at an Islamic site by European archaeologists anywhere in the Islamic world. Despite this early promise, for most of the 20th century, the Islamic period was the preserve of art historians, with only a handful of small-scale excavations conducted at the spectacular palatial-cities, mosques, ribats, and fortresses of Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya. Since the 1990s, there has been a significant rise in the number of projects and amount of evidence available, as well as a new interest in revisiting old questions and models for the Islamic period. This chapter charts the development of Islamic archaeology and lays out the key scholarly debates in Ifriqiya and the central Maghreb, broadly understood as encompassing modern-day Tunisia, Algeria, and western coastal Libya.

Type: Book chapter
Title: Ifriqiya and the central Maghreb
DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199987870.013.9
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199987870.013...
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: North Africa, Ifriqiya, Islamic archaeology, urbanism, ceramics, rural landscapes, religion
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Institute of Archaeology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Institute of Archaeology > Institute of Archaeology Gordon Square
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10067414
Downloads since deposit
2Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item