UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

A Comparative Analysis of the Status Anxiety Hypothesis of Socio-economic Inequalities in Health Based on 18,349 individuals in Four Countries and Five Cohort Studies

Layte, R; McCrory, C; Cheallaigh, CN; Bourke, N; Kivimaki, M; Ribeiro, AI; Stringhini, S; (2019) A Comparative Analysis of the Status Anxiety Hypothesis of Socio-economic Inequalities in Health Based on 18,349 individuals in Four Countries and Five Cohort Studies. Scientific Reports , 9 , Article 796. 10.1038/s41598-018-37440-7. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
s41598-018-37440-7.pdf - Published version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

The status anxiety hypothesis proposes that systematic inflammation as a consequence of chronic psycho-social stress is a possible pathway linking socio-economic position (SEP) to premature ageing and is a possible explanation for cross-national variation in patterns of health and well-being. Harmonised data from the LIFEPATH consortium on 18,349 individuals aged 50 to 75 and 30,632 observations are used to measure variation in the association between inflammation measured as C-reactive protein and SEP across four countries (Britain, Ireland, Portugal and Switzerland) and five studies (ELSA, Whitehall II, TILDA, EPIPorto and SKIPOGH). Adjusting for population composition, mean concentrations of CRP are highest in Portugal, the country with the highest income inequality and lowest in Switzerland, a lower income inequality country. Across all of the studies, lower SEP groups have higher mean concentrations of CRP and, as predicted by the theory, absolute differentials between SEP groups reflect the pattern of societal income inequality. Adjustment for lifestyle indicators reduces SEP differentials by between 45% and 52% but cannot account for country variation in mean inflammation.

Type: Article
Title: A Comparative Analysis of the Status Anxiety Hypothesis of Socio-economic Inequalities in Health Based on 18,349 individuals in Four Countries and Five Cohort Studies
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-37440-7
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-37440-7
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2019. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10067369
Downloads since deposit
24Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item