UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Adherence with a low-FODMAP diet in irritable bowel syndrome: are eating disorders the missing link?

Mari, A; Hosadurg, D; Martin, L; Zarate-Lopez, N; Passananti, V; Emmanuel, A; (2019) Adherence with a low-FODMAP diet in irritable bowel syndrome: are eating disorders the missing link? European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology , 31 (2) pp. 178-182. 10.1097/MEG.0000000000001317. Green open access

[thumbnail of Emmanuel_SCOFF SUBMISSION -accepted.pdf]
Preview
Text
Emmanuel_SCOFF SUBMISSION -accepted.pdf - Accepted version

Download (308kB) | Preview

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The low-FODMAP diet has emerged as an option for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This diet is very restrictive, and compliance is usually low. Preliminary findings suggest an association between eating disorders (EDs) and the risk of developing IBS. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between compliance with a low-FODMAP diet and the risk of ED behaviours among patients with IBS. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A single-centre prospective study was carried out among 233 IBS patients (79.8% females) at University College London Hospital, who commenced a low FODMAPs group programme for IBS (Rome III or IV). Self-reported diet adherence at the end of the 6-week programme was measured. At baseline, and at the 6-week follow-up visit, participants completed the validated IBS-Symptom Severity Score, the SCOFF ED screening questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. RESULTS: Adherence with a low-FODMAP diet was found in 95 (41%) patients. Overall, 54 (23%) patients were classified to be at risk for ED behaviour. Adherence was 57% in the ED group (31/54) versus 35% in the non-ED group (64/179); P<0.05. Adherence with a low-FODMAP diet was highest (51%) in the IBS with diarrhoea subtype and lowest (10%) in IBS with constipation. There was no significant correlation between IBS-Symptom Severity Score and either adherence (P=0.39) or ED behaviour (P=0.28). CONCLUSION: In this IBS cohort, greater adherence to a low-FODMAP diet is associated with ED behaviour. The implications of our study are important in clinical practice for a clinician to have a high index of suspicion of EDs in IBS patients when a high level of low-FODMAP diet achieved.

Type: Article
Title: Adherence with a low-FODMAP diet in irritable bowel syndrome: are eating disorders the missing link?
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1097/MEG.0000000000001317
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1097/MEG.0000000000001317
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: eating disorders, FODMAP, irritable bowel syndrome
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inst for Liver and Digestive Hlth
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10067286
Downloads since deposit
122Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item