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Non-invasive longitudinal bioluminescence imaging of human mesoangioblasts in bioengineered esophagi

Crowley, C; Butler, C; Camilli, C; Hynds, R; Kolluri, KK; Janes, SM; De Coppi, P; (2019) Non-invasive longitudinal bioluminescence imaging of human mesoangioblasts in bioengineered esophagi. Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods , 25 (2) pp. 103-113. 10.1089/ten.TEC.2018.0351. Green open access

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Abstract

Esophageal engineering aims to create replacement solutions by generating hollow organs using a combination of cells, scaffolds and regeneration-stimulating factors. Currently, the fate of cells on tissue-engineered grafts is generally determined retrospectively by histological analyses. Unfortunately, quality-controlled cell seeding protocols for application in human patients are not standard practice. As such, the field requires simple, fast and reliable techniques for non-invasive, highly specific cell tracking. Here, we show that bioluminescence imaging is a suitable method to track human mesoangioblast seeding of an esophageal tubular construct at every stage of the pre-clinical bioengineering pipeline. In particular, validation of bioluminescence imaging as longitudinal quantitative assessment of cell density, proliferation, seeding efficiency, bioreactor culture and cell survival upon implantation in vivo was performed against standard methods in 2D cultures and in 3D decellularized esophageal scaffolds. The technique is simple, non-invasive and provides information on mesangioblast distribution over entire scaffolds. Bioluminescence is an invaluable tool in the development of complex bioartificial organs and can assist in the development of standardized cell seeding protocols, with the ability to track cells from bioreactor through to implantation.

Type: Article
Title: Non-invasive longitudinal bioluminescence imaging of human mesoangioblasts in bioengineered esophagi
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1089/ten.TEC.2018.0351
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1089/ten.TEC.2018.0351
Language: English
Additional information: © Claire Crowley et al. 2019; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. This Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0).
Keywords: tissue engineering, transplantation, tissue scaffolds, bioluminescence
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > The Ear Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Oncology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Metabolism and Experi Therapeutics
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Respiratory Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Development Bio and Cancer Prog
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10067063
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