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Early-life exposure to household chemicals and wheezing in children

Mikes, O; Vrbova, M; Klanova, J; Cupr, P; Svancara, J; Pikhart, H; (2019) Early-life exposure to household chemicals and wheezing in children. Science of the Total Environment , 663 pp. 418-425. 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.01.254. Green open access

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Abstract

The prevalence of the asthmatic symptoms among children increases globally over the time. Reduced exposure to pathogens in early childhood and increased exposure to anthropogenic irritants result in increased risk of wheezing in children, and all of this may be related to the usage of household chemicals. Objective of this analysis thus was to study the potential effects of overall exposure to home chemicals in the early life on the phenotypes of wheezing from birth until five years of age. 3411 mother-infant pairs from the Czech part of the European Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood (ELSPAC-CZ) participated in the study. The exposure was estimated by the composite household chemical score from 18 chemical-based products. Social, medical and environmental factors were taken into account as covariates in multivariable multinomial logistic regression using phenotypes of wheezing as a study outcome. We were able to determine the association between several wheezing childhood phenotypes and the frequent usage of household chemicals in the fully adjusted model. Statistically significant odds ratios (OR) for increasing exposures per 1 SD of exposure score were obtained for the intermediate onset transient (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.10–1.47), intermediated onset persistent (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03–1.46), and early onset persistent phenotypes (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.04–1.77) in comparison to never wheezing children. Moreover, the persistent phenotypes were significantly associated with school age asthma. Our study has shown the negative role of the increased household chemicals usage on the respiratory outcomes in children up to five years of age. Overall evaluation of the household chemical exposure may be useful tool for any large epidemiological studies.

Type: Article
Title: Early-life exposure to household chemicals and wheezing in children
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.01.254
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.01.254
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Wheezing, Household chemicals, Asthma, ELSPAC, Cohort, Children, Indoor
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10066856
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