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Maternal diabetes in early pregnancy, and psychotic experiences and depressive symptoms in 10-year-old offspring: A population-based birth cohort study

Yamasaki, S; Ando, S; Richards, M; Hatch, SL; Koike, S; Fujikawa, S; Kanata, S; ... Nishida, A; + view all (2019) Maternal diabetes in early pregnancy, and psychotic experiences and depressive symptoms in 10-year-old offspring: A population-based birth cohort study. Schizophrenia Research 10.1016/j.schres.2018.12.016. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Epidemiological studies have suggested that maternal diabetes in pregnancy increases the risk of schizophrenia in offspring. A recent cohort study observed that maternal diabetes in early pregnancy is also associated with psychotic experiences in the general adolescent population. However, it remains unclear whether maternal diabetes in early pregnancy is specifically associated with psychotic experiences, or is generally associated with broader mental health problems, including depressive symptoms in adolescence. The present study investigated the longitudinal associations between maternal diabetes in early pregnancy, and psychotic experiences and depressive symptoms in 10-year-old offspring. Our data were derived from the Tokyo Early Adolescence Survey, a population-based survey of early adolescents (N = 4478) and their primary caregivers. Diabetes in early pregnancy was determined by records in the mother's Maternal and Child Health Handbook, documented during the pregnancy. Psychotic experiences and depressive symptoms were established through self-report by the offspring at 10 years of age. Diabetes in early pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of hallucination in the offspring (auditory hallucination [odds ratio {OR} 4.33, 95% confidence interval {CI} 1.12-16.75]; visual hallucination [OR 6.58, 95% CI 1.69-25.66]), even after adjusting for depressive symptoms and other covariates. However, the association between maternal diabetes and delusional thoughts was not significant and diabetes in early pregnancy was not associated with adolescent depressive symptoms. Our investigation suggests that maternal diabetes in early pregnancy may specifically affect the risk of hallucinatory experiences in adolescent offspring.

Type: Article
Title: Maternal diabetes in early pregnancy, and psychotic experiences and depressive symptoms in 10-year-old offspring: A population-based birth cohort study
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2018.12.016
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2018.12.016
Language: English
Additional information: © 2018 The Authors. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Keywords: Adolescence, Depression, Diabetes, Hallucination, Perinatal
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10065955
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