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Clinical practice recommendations for the diagnosis and management of X-linked hypophosphataemia

Haffner, D; Emma, F; Eastwood, DM; Biosse Duplan, M; Bacchetta, J; Schnabel, D; Wicart, P; ... Linglart, A; + view all (2019) Clinical practice recommendations for the diagnosis and management of X-linked hypophosphataemia. Nature Reviews Nephrology , 15 pp. 435-455. 10.1038/s41581-019-0152-5. Green open access

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Abstract

X-linked hypophosphataemia (XLH) is the most common cause of inherited phosphate wasting and is associated with severe complications such as rickets, lower limb deformities, pain, poor mineralization of the teeth and disproportionate short stature in children as well as hyperparathyroidism, osteomalacia, enthesopathies, osteoarthritis and pseudofractures in adults. The characteristics and severity of XLH vary between patients. Because of its rarity, the diagnosis and specific treatment of XLH are frequently delayed, which has a detrimental effect on patient outcomes. In this Evidence-Based Guideline, we recommend that the diagnosis of XLH is based on signs of rickets and/or osteomalacia in association with hypophosphataemia and renal phosphate wasting in the absence of vitamin D or calcium deficiency. Whenever possible, the diagnosis should be confirmed by molecular genetic analysis or measurement of levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) before treatment. Owing to the multisystemic nature of the disease, patients should be seen regularly by multidisciplinary teams organized by a metabolic bone disease expert. In this article, we summarize the current evidence and provide recommendations on features of the disease, including new treatment modalities, to improve knowledge and provide guidance for diagnosis and multidisciplinary care.

Type: Article
Title: Clinical practice recommendations for the diagnosis and management of X-linked hypophosphataemia
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41581-019-0152-5
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41581-019-0152-5
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Bone, Clinical genetics, Phosphorus metabolism disorders, Therapeutics
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Renal Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10065936
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