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Mechanisms for the control of local tissue blood flow during thermal interventions: influence of temperature- dependent ATP release from human blood and endothelial cells

Kalsi, KK; Chiesa, ST; Trangmar, SJ; Ali, L; Lotlikar, MD; Gonzalez-Alonso, J; (2017) Mechanisms for the control of local tissue blood flow during thermal interventions: influence of temperature- dependent ATP release from human blood and endothelial cells. Experimental Physiology , 102 (2) pp. 228-244. 10.1113/EP085910. Green open access

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Abstract

New Findings What is the central question of this study? Skin and muscle blood flow increases with heating and decreases with cooling, but the temperature‐sensitive mechanisms underlying these responses are not fully elucidated. What is the main finding and its importance? We found that local tissue hyperaemia was related to elevations in ATP release from erythrocytes. Increasing intravascular ATP augmented skin and tissue perfusion to levels equal or above thermal hyperaemia. ATP release from isolated erythrocytes was altered by heating and cooling. Our findings suggest that erythrocytes are involved in thermal regulation of blood flow via modulation of ATP release. Local tissue perfusion changes with alterations in temperature during heating and cooling, but the thermosensitivity of the vascular ATP signalling mechanisms for control of blood flow during thermal interventions remains unknown. Here, we tested the hypotheses that the release of the vasodilator mediator ATP from human erythrocytes, but not from endothelial cells or other blood constituents, is sensitive to both increases and reductions in temperature and that increasing intravascular ATP availability with ATP infusion would potentiate thermal hyperaemia in limb tissues. We first measured blood temperature, brachial artery blood flow and plasma [ATP] during passive arm heating and cooling in healthy men and found that they increased by 3.0 ± 1.2°C, 105 ± 25 ml min−1 °C−1 and twofold, respectively, (all P < 0.05) with heating, but decreased or remained unchanged with cooling. In additional men, infusion of ATP into the brachial artery increased skin and deep tissue perfusion to levels equal or above thermal hyperaemia. In isolated erythrocyte samples exposed to different temperatures, ATP release increased 1.9‐fold from 33 to 39°C (P < 0.05) and declined by ∼50% at 20°C (P < 0.05), but no changes were observed in cultured human endothelial cells, plasma or serum samples. In conclusion, increases in plasma [ATP] and skin and deep tissue perfusion with limb heating are associated with elevations in ATP release from erythrocytes, but not from endothelial cells or other blood constituents. Erythrocyte ATP release is also sensitive to temperature reductions, suggesting that erythrocytes may function as thermal sensors and ATP signalling generators for control of tissue perfusion during thermal interventions.

Type: Article
Title: Mechanisms for the control of local tissue blood flow during thermal interventions: influence of temperature- dependent ATP release from human blood and endothelial cells
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1113/EP085910
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1113/EP085910
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Clinical Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10065753
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