UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Whole-body heat stress and exercise stimulate the appearance of platelet microvesicles in plasma with limited influence of vascular shear stress

Wilhelm, EN; González-Alonso, J; Chiesa, ST; Trangmar, SJ; Kalsi, KK; Rakobowchuk, M; (2017) Whole-body heat stress and exercise stimulate the appearance of platelet microvesicles in plasma with limited influence of vascular shear stress. Physiological Reports , 5 (21) , Article e13496. 10.14814/phy2.13496. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Wilhelm et al 2017 - Physiol Rep.pdf - Published version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Intense, large muscle mass exercise increases circulating microvesicles, but our understanding of microvesicle dynamics and mechanisms inducing their release remains limited. However, increased vascular shear stress is generally thought to be involved. Here, we manipulated exercise‐independent and exercise‐dependent shear stress using systemic heat stress with localized single‐leg cooling (low shear) followed by single‐leg knee extensor exercise with the cooled or heated leg (Study 1, n = 8) and whole‐body passive heat stress followed by cycling (Study 2, n = 8). We quantified femoral artery shear rates (SRs) and arterial and venous platelet microvesicles (PMV–CD41+) and endothelial microvesicles (EMV–CD62E+). In Study 1, mild passive heat stress while one leg remained cooled did not affect [microvesicle] (P ≥ 0.05). Single‐leg knee extensor exercise increased active leg SRs by ~12‐fold and increased arterial and venous [PMVs] by two‐ to threefold, even in the nonexercising contralateral leg (P < 0.05). In Study 2, moderate whole‐body passive heat stress increased arterial [PMV] compared with baseline (mean±SE, from 19.9 ± 1.5 to 35.5 ± 5.4 PMV.μL−1.103, P < 0.05), and cycling with heat stress increased [PMV] further in the venous circulation (from 27.5 ± 2.2 at baseline to 57.5 ± 7.2 PMV.μL−1.103 during cycling with heat stress, P < 0.05), with a tendency for increased appearance of PMV across exercising limbs. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that whole‐body heat stress may increase arterial [PMV], and intense exercise engaging either large or small muscle mass promote PMV formation locally and systemically, with no influence upon [EMV]. Local shear stress, however, does not appear to be the major stimulus modulating PMV formation in healthy humans.

Type: Article
Title: Whole-body heat stress and exercise stimulate the appearance of platelet microvesicles in plasma with limited influence of vascular shear stress
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.14814/phy2.13496
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.13496
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Cycling, dynamic knee extensor exercise, microparticles, passive heating, shear stress
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Clinical Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10065751
Downloads since deposit
45Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item