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Self-Reported Fatigue in Children Following Intensive Care Treatment.

Colville, GA; Pierce, CM; Peters, MJ; (2019) Self-Reported Fatigue in Children Following Intensive Care Treatment. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine , 20 (2) e98-e101. 10.1097/PCC.0000000000001794. Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives: Adults report high levels of fatigue after intensive care, but little is known about pediatric survivors. This study aimed to explore rates of self-reported fatigue in children after critical illness. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Tertiary children’s hospital. Patients: Ninety-seven children aged 7–17 years old. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Children completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Multidimensional Fatigue Scale 3 months after discharge from PICU. Comparisons with normative data (n = 209) showed that PICU survivors reported similar mean (SD) total fatigue scores to their healthy peers (79.6 [16.3] vs 81.8 [12.5]; p = 0.239), but greater cognitive fatigue (77.4 [21.9] vs 82.4 [16.4]; p = 0.048). Also children who had sustained a traumatic brain injury reported “less” sleep/rest fatigue (84.6 [15.0] vs 76.8 [16.3]; p = 0.006). Baseline indices of severity of illness were not associated with fatigue. Conclusions: The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Multidimensional Fatigue Scale appears to be a promising tool for use in outcomes research with PICU survivors. These results highlight the need to bear in mind the heterogeneity of PICU patients and the multidimensional nature of fatigue symptoms.

Type: Article
Title: Self-Reported Fatigue in Children Following Intensive Care Treatment.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1097/PCC.0000000000001794
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001794
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: outcome measures; PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale; quality of life; recovery; traumatic brain injury
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10065687
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