UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Monitoring contaminants, emerging infectious diseases and environmental change with raptors, and links to human health

Movalli, P; Krone, O; Osborn, D; Pain, D; (2019) Monitoring contaminants, emerging infectious diseases and environmental change with raptors, and links to human health. Bird Study 10.1080/00063657.2018.1506735. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Monitoring contaminants emerging infectious diseases and environmental change with raptors and links to human health.pdf]
Preview
Text
Monitoring contaminants emerging infectious diseases and environmental change with raptors and links to human health.pdf - Published version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

CAPSULE: Raptor research and monitoring informs issues of relevance to human health, including environmental contamination, emerging infectious diseases and environmental change. AIMS: The paper examines the relevance of raptor research and monitoring to inform issues of relevance to human health, including environmental contamination, emerging vector-borne diseases and environmental change. METHODS: Reviews of European Union policy context and role of raptor research and monitoring in detection of and response to contaminants. Examples include lead ammunition in White-tailed Sea Eagles Haliaeetus albicilla in Europe, and impacts of diclofenac on Gyps vultures in the Indian subcontinent. Comments on the relevance of raptor research and monitoring to emerging infectious diseases and environmental change, and considers the links between raptors and humans. RESULTS: Biomonitoring of contaminants in raptors can perform useful purposes in relation to chemicals legislation. Raptors are useful sentinels of exposure to and effects of chemicals in the environment. Raptor research and monitoring can also elucidate environmental change and spread of emerging infectious diseases. Raptors are linked to humans through social, cultural and economic values. CONCLUSION: Raptors can be used to provide information relevant to human health and well-being. There are a number of challenges and opportunities in relating raptor research and monitoring to human health. Several areas with potential for development are outlined. The COST Action ‘European Raptor Biomonitoring Facility’ and the forthcoming LIFE APEX project will take forward relevant work.

Type: Article
Title: Monitoring contaminants, emerging infectious diseases and environmental change with raptors, and links to human health
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/00063657.2018.1506735
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/00063657.2018.1506735
Language: English
Additional information: © 2018 The Author(s). This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Dept of Earth Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10065524
Downloads since deposit
64Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item