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Body Composition Changes and 10-Year Mortality Risk in Older Brazilian Adults: Analysis of Prospective Data from the SABE Study

de Almeida Roediger, M; de Fátima Nunes Marucci, M; Quintiliano Scarpelli Dourado, DA; de Oliveira, C; Licio Ferreira Santos, J; de Oliveira Duarte, YA; (2019) Body Composition Changes and 10-Year Mortality Risk in Older Brazilian Adults: Analysis of Prospective Data from the SABE Study. Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging , 23 (1) pp. 51-59. 10.1007/s12603-018-1118-1. Green open access

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Aging related alterations in body composition are associated with higher all-cause mortality risk. OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations between 10-year mortality risk with both BMI and body composition, as well as to establish whether these relationships are modified by age and gender, using data from community-dwelling older Brazilian adults. METHODS: We used data from two waves i.e., 2000 and 2010 of the SABE (Health, Well-being, and Aging) study conducted in São Paulo, Brazil, involving a probabilistic sample of community-dwelling older adults aged 60 years and older. The variables of the study were: mortality (in 10-year follow-up period), body mass index (BMI), body composition (waist circumference, waist hip ratio, triceps skinfold thickness, mid-upper arm circumference, calf circumference, and arm muscle area) and covariables (sociodemographic characteristics, life style, self-reported health conditions, number of chronic diseases, Mini mental state exam, and Geriatric depression scale). Poisson regression estimates with STATA statistical software were used for statistical analyses, considering all p-values < 0.05. RESULTS: Over the 10-year follow-up period, there were 769 deaths (40.2%). The mortality rate was 61.0 for men and 111.8 for the ≥80 age group. In the fully adjusted model, statistically significant hazard ratios were found for low muscle mass (IRR: 1.33), underweight (IRR: 1.29), and low fat mass (IRR: 1.31) with mortality. Men in extreme BMI categories (underweight - IRR: 1.47; obesity I - IRR: 1.66; and obesity II - IRR: 1.91) and women with low muscle and low fat mass were significantly associated with mortality risk. In the ≥80 age group it was observed that low muscle mass (IRR: 168.7), inadequate body reserves (IRR: 1.63), low fat mass (IRR: 140.7), and underweight (IRR: 142.9) were associated with mortality risk. Waist circumference demonstrated protection for mortality in the high-risk categorization for the ≥80 age group. CONCLUSION: Our results showed that underweight, low fat mass, and low muscle mass were associated with mortality risk, presenting different roles considering gender and age in older Brazilian adults over a 10-year follow-up period.

Type: Article
Title: Body Composition Changes and 10-Year Mortality Risk in Older Brazilian Adults: Analysis of Prospective Data from the SABE Study
Location: France
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s12603-018-1118-1
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-018-1118-1
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Aging, body composition, community-dwelling, mortality
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10064924
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