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Shared Struggles? Cumulative Strain Theory and Public Mass Murderers from 1990 to 2014

Silver, J; Horgan, J; Gill, P; (2019) Shared Struggles? Cumulative Strain Theory and Public Mass Murderers from 1990 to 2014. Homicide Studies , 23 (1) pp. 64-84. 10.1177/1088767918802881. Green open access

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Abstract

Scholars have urged a shift in research on mass murder from the creation of typologies to theoretically rich, data-driven comparative examinations of the phenomenon. We seek to redress such calls in two ways. First, we analyze a unique sample of public mass murderers through the multistage explanatory model of cumulative strain theory. Second, we use a comparison group of similarly violent offenders—lone actor terrorists—to provide context to our findings. The results demonstrate that cumulative strain theory usefully describes the trajectory toward violence of public mass murderers, more so when a concept implicit in the theory—grievance—is made explicit.

Type: Article
Title: Shared Struggles? Cumulative Strain Theory and Public Mass Murderers from 1990 to 2014
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/1088767918802881
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1088767918802881
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: mass murder, subtypes, school shootings, comparative, methodology, terrorism, strain theory
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Security and Crime Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10064510
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