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Using a birth cohort to study brain health and preclinical dementia: recruitment and participation rates in Insight 46

James, S-N; Lane, CA; Parker, TD; Lu, K; Collins, JD; Murray-Smith, H; Byford, M; ... Richards, M; + view all (2018) Using a birth cohort to study brain health and preclinical dementia: recruitment and participation rates in Insight 46. BMC Research Notes , 11 , Article 885. 10.1186/s13104-018-3995-0. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Identifying and recruiting people with early pre-symptomatic Alzheimer's disease to neuroimaging research studies is increasingly important. The extent to which results of these studies can be generalised depends on the recruitment and representativeness of the participants involved. We now report the recruitment and participation patterns from a neuroscience sub-study of the MRC National Survey of Health and Development, "Insight 46". This study aimed to recruit 500 participants for extensive clinical and neuropsychological testing, and neuroimaging. We investigate how sociodemographic factors, health conditions and health-related behaviours predict participation at different levels of recruitment. RESULTS: We met our target recruitment (n = 502). Higher educational attainment and non-manual socio-economic position (SEP) were consistent predictors of recruitment. Health-related variables were also predictive at every level of recruitment; in particular higher cognition, not smoking and better self-rating health. Sex and APOE-e4 status were not predictors of participation at any level. Whilst recruitment targets were met, individuals with lower SEP, lower cognition, and more health problems are under-represented in Insight 46. Understanding the factors that influence recruitment are important when interpreting results; for Insight 46 it is likely that health-related outcomes and life course risks will under-estimate those seen in the general population.

Type: Article
Title: Using a birth cohort to study brain health and preclinical dementia: recruitment and participation rates in Insight 46
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13104-018-3995-0
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-018-3995-0
Language: English
Additional information: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Attrition, Birth cohort, Longitudinal study, Neuroimaging, Older adults, Participation, Sub-study
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neurodegenerative Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10064459
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