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Capturing sexual contact patterns in modelling the spread of sexually transmitted infections: Evidence using Natsal-3

Datta, S; Mercer, CH; Keeling, MJ; (2018) Capturing sexual contact patterns in modelling the spread of sexually transmitted infections: Evidence using Natsal-3. PLOS ONE , 13 (11) , Article e0206501. 10.1371/journal.pone.0206501. Green open access

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Abstract

Understanding the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in a population is of great importance to the planning and delivery of health services globally. The worldwide rise of HIV since the 1980’s, and the recent increase in common STIs (including HPV and Chlamydia) in many countries, means that there is an urgent need to understand transmission dynamics in order to better predict the spread of such infections in the population. Unlike many other infections which can be captured by assumptions of random mixing, STI transmission is intimately linked to the number and pattern of sexual contacts. In fact, it is the huge variation in the number of new sexual partners that gives rise to the extremes of risk within populations which need to be captured in predictive models of STI transmission. Such models are vital in providing the necessary scientific evidence to determine whether a range of controls (from education to screening to vaccination) are cost-effective.

Type: Article
Title: Capturing sexual contact patterns in modelling the spread of sexually transmitted infections: Evidence using Natsal-3
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0206501
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0206501
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2018 Datta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Keywords: Sexually transmitted diseases, Simulation and modeling, Vaccination and immunization, Chlamydia infection, Men who have sex with men, Age groups, Human papillomavirus infection, Sexual identity
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10061989
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