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Opioid-free colorectal surgery: a method to improve patient & financial outcomes in surgery

Keller, DS; Zhang, J; Chand, M; (2019) Opioid-free colorectal surgery: a method to improve patient & financial outcomes in surgery. Surgical Endoscopy , 33 (6) pp. 1959-1966. 10.1007/s00464-018-6477-5. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Opioids are a mainstay for postsurgical pain management, but have associated complications and costs, and contribute to the opioid epidemic. While efforts to reduce opioid use exist, little study has been done on opioid utilization and its impact across surgical approaches. Our goal was to evaluate the impact of opioid utilization on quality measures and costs after open and laparoscopic colorectal surgery. METHODS: The Premier database was reviewed for inpatient colorectal procedures from January 01, 2014, to September 30, 2015. Procedures were stratified into open and laparoscopic approaches, then "opioid" and "opioid-free" groups within each approach. Univariate analysis compared demographics, outcomes, and cost by opioid use and surgical approach. In the "opioid" groups, opioid consumption and duration were assessed across platforms. Multivariate regression analyzed the association between opioid use and surgical approach on costs and quality outcomes. RESULTS: 50,098 procedures were evaluated-40.4% laparoscopic and 59.6% open. 6.6% of laparoscopic and 5.3% of open cases were "opioid free." Across both approaches, patients over 65 were most likely opioid free, while the obese and cancer patients were most likely to use opioids. Length of stay was shorter, and post-discharge nursing needs and total costs were lower in the "opioid-free" group in both approaches (all p < 0.001). The median daily and total opioid consumption were lower with a laparoscopic approach (p < 0.001), which also had a shorter duration of use versus open cases (p < 0.001). Opioids were 20% more likely in open cases. Total costs were 16% greater with opioids and 24% greater in open surgery. Complications were 89% more likely in open surgery. Readmissions were increased by 14% with both opioid use and open surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Opioid-free colorectal surgery results in improved outcomes, and laparoscopy further improves these results. Continued efforts to increase laparoscopy are key for reducing opioids and improving outcomes as we transition to value-based care.

Type: Article
Title: Opioid-free colorectal surgery: a method to improve patient & financial outcomes in surgery
Location: Germany
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00464-018-6477-5
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00464-018-6477-5
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Complications, Healthcare costs, Healthcare outcomes, Laparoscopic colorectal surgery, Opioid-free pain management, Opioids, Readmissions
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10060532
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