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Non-adherence to oral antibiotics for community paediatric pneumonia treatment in Malawi - A qualitative investigation

King, C; Nightingale, R; Phiri, T; Zadutsa, B; Kainja, E; Makwenda, C; Colbourn, T; (2018) Non-adherence to oral antibiotics for community paediatric pneumonia treatment in Malawi - A qualitative investigation. PLoS One , 13 (10) , Article e0206404. 10.1371/journal.pone.0206404. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pneumonia remains the leading cause of paediatric infectious mortality globally. Treatment failure, which can result from non-adherence to oral antibiotics, can lead to poor outcomes and therefore improving adherence could be a strategy to reduce pneumonia related morbidity and mortality. However, there is little published evidence from low-resource settings for the drivers of non-adherence to oral antibiotics in children. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate reasons for adherence and non-adherence in children diagnosed and treated in the community with fast-breathing pneumonia in rural Malawi. METHODS: We conducted focus group discussions (FGDs) with caregivers of children known to have been diagnosed and treated with oral antibiotics for fast-breathing pneumonia in the community and key informant interviews with community healthcare workers (CHW). FGDs and interviews were conducted within communities in Chichewa, the local language. We used a framework approach to analyze the transcripts. RESULTS: We conducted 4 FGDs with caregivers and 10 interviews with CHWs. We identified four themes, which were common across caregivers and CHWs: knowledge and understanding, effort, medication perceptions and community influences. Caregivers and CHWs demonstrated good knowledge of pneumonia and types of treatment, but caregivers showed confusion around dosing and treatment durations. Effort was needed to seek care, prepare medication and understand regimens, acting as a barrier to adherence. Perceptions of how well the treatment was working influenced adherence, with both quick recovery and slow recovery leading to non-adherence. Community influences were both supportive, with transport assistance for referrals and home visits to improve adherence, and detrimental, with pressure to share treatments. CONCLUSION: Adherence to oral antibiotic treatment for fast-breathing pneumonia was understood to be important, however considerable barriers we described within this rural low-resource setting, such as the effort preparing and administering medication, community pressures to share drugs and potential complexity of regimens.

Type: Article
Title: Non-adherence to oral antibiotics for community paediatric pneumonia treatment in Malawi - A qualitative investigation
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0206404
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0206404
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2018 King et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Primary Care and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10060516
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