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The Role of Incentives in Long-Term Nutritional and Growth Studies in Children

Mis, NF; Kennedy, K; Fewtrell, M; Campoy, C; Koletzko, B; Working Group on Early Nutrition Research, ESPGHAN, .; (2018) The Role of Incentives in Long-Term Nutritional and Growth Studies in Children. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition , 67 (6) pp. 767-772. 10.1097/MPG.0000000000002143. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Available published advice on use of incentives is limited and generally refers to short term studies without longer follow-up, predominantly conducted in developed countries. We aim to summarise published information related to the use of incentives in long-term nutrition studies involving infants, children and adolescents and the views of researchers in the field, in order to provide guidance on acceptable incentives. METHODS: We conducted a literature review and a short online survey of researchers regarding their opinions on the use of incentives in paediatric long-term (follow-up) clinical studies. RESULTS: Responses from 38 researchers from 14 different countries indicated that 41% had used incentives to increase participation and 29% to 73%, depending on child age and type of procedure, thought incentives may be used to increase compliance with follow-up visits. A small number of respondents thought incentives would not be approved by national ethics boards. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the literature review and the survey results, and ESPGHAN working group concluded that incentives for children and adolescents up to the value of 30 euros, based on average EU income levels, may be offered as cash, vouchers or age appropriate gifts or toys, in addition to reimbursing expenses. Additional incentives may be offered if a study includes more burdening procedures, techniques that may appear frightening for younger children, or requires sustained participation (e.g. dietary diaries or activity monitoring). There was agreement that it is preferable to give toys or gifts rather than money to younger children.

Type: Article
Title: The Role of Incentives in Long-Term Nutritional and Growth Studies in Children
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000002143
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0000000000002143
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: infants, monetary, non-monetary, long-term nutrition projects, long-term paediatric projects
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10059622
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