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Outpacing the pneumococcus: Antibody dynamics in the first few days following pneumococcal capsular antigen stimulation

Kimaro Mlacha, SZ; Warira, A; Gatakaa, H; Goldblatt, D; Scott, JAG; (2018) Outpacing the pneumococcus: Antibody dynamics in the first few days following pneumococcal capsular antigen stimulation. Scientific Reports , 8 , Article 15376. 10.1038/s41598-018-33735-x. Green open access

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Abstract

Children in developing countries are frequently exposed to the pneumococcus, but few develop invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). We test the hypothesis that natural variation exists in the rapidity of IgG responses following exposure to pneumococcal polysaccharides, and that these differences are sufficiently great to affect susceptibility to and outcome of IPD. We recruited children aged 24-36 months, who had recovered from IPD, and age-matched healthy controls and vaccinated them with 1 dose of the 23-valent PPV to mimic natural exposure. We collected serum samples after vaccination and analysed the dynamics of anti-polysaccharide antibody responses to several capsular antigens. Mean IgG response times to different serotypes were 6.4-7.3 days, with standard deviations of 0.9-1.85 days, suggesting a natural range in response times of up to 7 days. Serotype 1 elicited the largest fold-rise, serotype 23F the smallest. The proportion of responses achieved by day 7 was similar in children with a history of IPD and healthy children. There was considerable natural variation in the rapidity of anti-capsular IgG responses extending over 4-7 days. There was no evidence to suggest that children who have experienced IPD respond more slowly to heterologous pneumococcal capsular antigens than do healthy children.

Type: Article
Title: Outpacing the pneumococcus: Antibody dynamics in the first few days following pneumococcal capsular antigen stimulation
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-33735-x
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-33735-x
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10059562
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