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Impact of eating disorders on obstetric outcomes in a large clinical sample: A comparison with the HUNT study

Eik-Nes, TT; Horn, J; Strohmaier, S; Holmen, TL; Micali, N; Bjørnelv, S; (2018) Impact of eating disorders on obstetric outcomes in a large clinical sample: A comparison with the HUNT study. International Journal of Eating Disorders , 51 (10) pp. 1134-1143. 10.1002/eat.22916. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Current evidence from clinical studies suggests that having an active eating disorder (ED) during pregnancy is associated with unfavorable obstetric outcomes. However, the role of a lifetime diagnosis of ED is not fully understood. Variations in findings suggest a need for additional studies of maternal ED. This study aims to identify associations between a lifetime ED and obstetric outcomes. METHOD: Data from a hospital patient register and a population-based study (The HUNT Study) were linked to the Medical Birth Registry in Norway. Register based information of obstetric complications (preeclampsia, preterm birth, perinatal deaths, small for gestational age (SGA), large for gestational age (LGA), Caesarean sections, and 5-min Apgar score) were acquired for 532 births of women with ED and 43,657 births of non-ED women. Multivariable regression in generalized estimating equations was used to account for clusters within women as they contributed multiple births to the dataset. RESULTS: After adjusting for parity, maternal age, marital status, and year of delivery, lifetime history of anorexia nervosa was associated with increased odds of having offspring who were SGA (Odds ratio (OR) 2.7, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.4-5.2). Women with a lifetime history of bulimia nervosa had higher odds of having a Caesarian section (OR 1.7 95% CI 1.1-2.5). Women with EDNOS/sub-threshold ED had a higher likelihood of having a low Apgar score at 5 min (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.1-8.8). CONCLUSION: Our study corroborates available evidence on the associations between maternal ED and adverse obstetric outcomes.

Type: Article
Title: Impact of eating disorders on obstetric outcomes in a large clinical sample: A comparison with the HUNT study
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/eat.22916
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.22916
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Registry Studies, Eating Disorders, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified, Birth Weight, Obstetric outcomes
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10059158
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