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Protocol for a Systematic Review of Autologous Fat Grafting for Wound Healing

Luck, J; Smith, OJ; Malik, D; Mosahebi, A; (2018) Protocol for a Systematic Review of Autologous Fat Grafting for Wound Healing. Systematic Reviews , 7 (99) 10.1186/s13643-018-0769-7. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Autologous fat grafting is an emerging therapeutic option for cutaneous wounds. The regenerative potential of autologous fat relates to the presence of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) within the stromal vascular fraction (SVF). ADSCs are capable of differentiating into fibroblasts and keratinocytes, as well as secreting soluble mediators with angiogenic and anti-inflammatory properties. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive assessment of the wound healing literature in humans. This systematic review aims to critically evaluate the efficacy and safety of autologous fat grafting in acute and chronic cutaneous wounds with an appraisal of the quality of evidence available. METHODS: Following PRISMA guidelines, MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane Library databases will be searched from inception to December 2017. All primary clinical studies in which wounds are treated with lipotransfer, cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL), SVF products or isolated ADSCs will be eligible for inclusion. Study screening and data extraction will be conducted by two authors in duplicate. Our primary outcome measure will be the proportion of completely healed wounds at 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures will include the proportion of partially healed wounds at 12 weeks; the mean wound surface area reduction at 12 weeks; the mean time to wound healing; and adverse event rates. The quality of evidence for each summary outcome measure will be assessed using the GRADE approach. DISCUSSION: In light of the growing popularity of autologous fat grafting for wound healing, a systematic appraisal of the available evidence is timely. If autologous fat grafting is associated with a positive treatment effect, we will compare these outcomes to those achieved using alternative wound management strategies. This review also aims to determine if one or more autologous fat grafting techniques are superior and whether this varies according to patient- and wound-specific factors. We anticipate that these results will guide future research and inform clinical practice.

Type: Article
Title: Protocol for a Systematic Review of Autologous Fat Grafting for Wound Healing
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13643-018-0769-7
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13643-018-0769-7
Language: English
Additional information: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Adipose-derived stem cells, Autologous fat, Cell-assisted lipotransfer, Fat grafting, Lipotransfer,Stromal vascular fraction, Wound healing, Ulcer, Systematic review
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10058712
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