UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Argon plasma improves the tissue integration and angiogenesis of subcutaneous implants by modifying surface chemistry and topography

Griffin, M; Palgrave, R; Baldovino-Medrano, V; Butler, P; Kalaskar, DM; (2018) Argon plasma improves the tissue integration and angiogenesis of subcutaneous implants by modifying surface chemistry and topography. International Journal of Nanomedicine , 13 pp. 6123-6141. 10.2147/IJN.S167637. Green open access

[thumbnail of Journal article]
Preview
Text (Journal article)
f_ijn-167637-argon-plasma-improves-the-tissue-integration-and-angiogenesi-100518_45078[52197].pdf - Published Version

Download (17MB) | Preview
[thumbnail of Correction dated 19 March 2019]
Preview
Text (Correction dated 19 March 2019)
18-mar-2019-ijn-206850-argon-plasma-improves-the-tissue-integration-and-angiogenesi.pdf - Published Version

Download (171kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Tissue integration and vessel formation are important criteria for the successful implantation of synthetic biomaterials for subcutaneous implantation. Objective: We report the optimization of plasma surface modification (PSM) using argon (Ar), oxygen (O2 ) and nitrogen (N2 ) gases of a polyurethane polymer to enhance tissue integration and angiogenesis. Methods: The scaffold’s bulk and surface characteristics were compared before and after PSM with either Ar, O2 and N2 . The viability and adhesion of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) on the modified scaffolds were compared. The formation of extracellular matrix by the HDFs on the modified scaffolds was evaluated. Scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in a mouse model for 3 months to analyze tissue integration, angiogenesis and capsule formation. Results: Surface analysis demonstrated that interfacial modification (chemistry, topography and wettability) achieved by PSM is unique and varies according to the gas used. O2 plasma led to extensive changes in interfacial properties, whereas Ar treatment caused moderate changes. N2 plasma caused the least effect on surface chemistry of the polymer. PSM-treated scaffolds significantly (P,0.05) enhanced HDF activity and growth over 21 days. Among all three gases, Ar modification showed the highest protein adsorption. Ar-modified scaffolds also showed a significant upregulation of adhesion-related proteins (vinculin, focal adhesion kinase, talin and paxillin; P,0.05) and extracellular matrix marker genes (collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin and elastin) and deposition of associated proteins by the HDFs. Subcutaneous implantation after 3 months demonstrated the highest tissue integration and angiogenesis and the lowest capsule formation on Ar-modified scaffolds compared with O2 - and N2 -modified scaffolds. Conclusion: PSM using Ar is a cost-effective and efficient method to improve the tissue integration and angiogenesis of subcutaneous implants

Type: Article
Title: Argon plasma improves the tissue integration and angiogenesis of subcutaneous implants by modifying surface chemistry and topography
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.2147/IJN.S167637
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S167637
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2018 Griffin et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License. The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
Keywords: tissue integration, angiogenesis, surface modification, biomaterials, implants
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Ortho and MSK Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Dept of Chemistry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10058203
Downloads since deposit
112Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item