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Brain responses to different types of salience in antipsychotic naive first episode psychosis: An fMRI study

Knolle, F; Ermakova, AO; Justicia, A; Fletcher, PC; Bunzeck, N; Düzel, E; Murray, GK; (2018) Brain responses to different types of salience in antipsychotic naive first episode psychosis: An fMRI study. Translational Psychiatry , 8 , Article 196. 10.1038/s41398-018-0250-3. Green open access

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Abstract

Abnormal salience processing has been suggested to contribute to the formation of positive psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia and related conditions. Previous research utilising reward learning or anticipation paradigms has demonstrated cortical and subcortical abnormalities in people with psychosis, specifically in the prefrontal cortex, the dopaminergic midbrain and the striatum. In these paradigms, reward prediction errors attribute motivational salience to stimuli. However, little is known about possible abnormalities across different forms of salience processing in psychosis patients, and whether any such abnormalities involve the dopaminergic midbrain. The aim of our study was, therefore, to investigate possible alterations in psychosis in neural activity in response to various forms of salience: novelty, negative emotion, targetness (task-driven salience) and rareness/deviance. We studied 14 antipsychotic naïve participants with first episode psychosis, and 37 healthy volunteers. During fMRI scanning, participants performed a visual oddball task containing these four forms of salience. Psychosis patients showed abnormally reduced signalling in the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA) for novelty, negative emotional salience and targetness; reduced striatal and occipital (lingual gyrus) signalling to novelty and negative emotional salience, reduced signalling in the amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex and parahippocamal gyrus to negative emotional salience, and reduced cerebellar signalling to novelty and negative emotional salience. Our results indicate alterations of several forms of salience processing in patients with psychosis in the midbrain SN/VTA, with additional subcortical and cortical regions also showing alterations in salience signalling, the exact pattern of alterations depending on the form of salience in question.

Type: Article
Title: Brain responses to different types of salience in antipsychotic naive first episode psychosis: An fMRI study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41398-018-0250-3
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41398-018-0250-3
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10058179
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