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Total MRI Small Vessel Disease Burden Correlates with Cognitive Performance, Cortical Atrophy, and Network Measures in a Memory Clinic Population

Banerjee, G; Jang, H; Kim, HJ; Kim, ST; Kim, JS; Lee, JH; Im, K; ... Werring, DJ; + view all (2018) Total MRI Small Vessel Disease Burden Correlates with Cognitive Performance, Cortical Atrophy, and Network Measures in a Memory Clinic Population. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease , 63 (4) pp. 1485-1497. 10.3233/JAD-170943. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests that combining individual imaging markers of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) may more accurately reflect its overall burden and better correlate with clinical measures. OBJECTIVE: We wished to establish the clinical relevance of the total SVD score in a memory clinic population by investigating the association with SVD score and cognitive performance, cortical atrophy, and structural network measures, after adjusting for amyloid-β burden. METHODS: We included 243 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer’s disease dementia, subcortical vascular MCI, or subcortical vascular dementia. All underwent MR and [11C] PiB-PET scanning and had standardized cognitive testing. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the relationships between SVD score and cognition, cortical thickness, and structural network measures. Path analyses were performed to evaluate whether network disruption mediates the effects of SVD score on cortical thickness and cognition. RESULTS: Total SVD score was associated with the performance of frontal (β – 4.31, SE 2.09, p = 0.040) and visuospatial (β – 0.95, SE 0.44, p = 0.032) tasks, and with reduced cortical thickness in widespread brain regions. Total SVD score was negatively correlated with nodal efficiency, as well as changes in brain network organization, with evidence of reduced integration and increasing segregation. Path analyses showed that the associations between SVD score and frontal and visuospatial scores were partially mediated by decreases in their corresponding nodal efficiency and cortical thickness. CONCLUSION: Total SVD burden has clinical relevance in a memory clinic population and correlates with cognition, and cortical atrophy, as well as structural network disruption.

Type: Article
Title: Total MRI Small Vessel Disease Burden Correlates with Cognitive Performance, Cortical Atrophy, and Network Measures in a Memory Clinic Population
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3233/JAD-170943
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-170943
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, cerebral small vessel diseases, cognitive dysfunction, magnetic resonance imaging, positronemission tomography, vascular dementia
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Institute of Prion Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Brain Repair and Rehabilitation
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10057881
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