UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Impact of language experience on attention to faces in infancy: Evidence from unimodal and bimodal bilingual infants

Mercure, E; Quiroz, I; Goldberg, L; Bowden-Howl, H; Coulson, K; Gliga, T; Filippi, R; ... Macsweeney, M; + view all (2018) Impact of language experience on attention to faces in infancy: Evidence from unimodal and bimodal bilingual infants. Frontiers in Psychology , 9 , Article 1943. 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01943. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Mercure VoR fpsyg-09-01943.pdf - Published version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Faces capture and maintain infants’ attention more than other visual stimuli. The present study addresses the impact of early language experience on attention to faces in infancy. It was hypothesized that infants learning two spoken languages (unimodal bilinguals) and hearing infants of Deaf mothers learning British Sign Language and spoken English (bimodal bilinguals) would show enhanced attention to faces compared to monolinguals. The comparison between unimodal and bimodal bilinguals allowed differentiation of the effects of learning two languages, from the effects of increased visual communication in hearing infants of Deaf mothers. Data is presented for two independent samples of infants: Sample 1 included 49 infants between 7 and 10 months (26 monolinguals and 23 unimodal bilinguals), and Sample 2 included 87 infants between 4 and 8 months (32 monolinguals, 25 unimodal bilinguals, and 30 bimodal bilingual infants with a Deaf mother). Eye-tracking was used to analyze infants’ visual scanning of complex arrays including a face and 4 other stimulus categories. Infants from 4 to 10 months (all groups combined) directed their attention to faces faster than to nonface stimuli (i.e. attention capture), directed more fixations to and looked longer at faces than non-face stimuli (i.e. attention maintenance). Unimodal bilinguals demonstrated increased attention capture and attention maintenance by faces compared to monolinguals. Contrary to predictions, bimodal bilinguals did not differ from monolinguals in attention capture and maintenance by face stimuli. These results are discussed in relation to the language experience of each group and the close association between face processing and language development in social communication.

Type: Article
Title: Impact of language experience on attention to faces in infancy: Evidence from unimodal and bimodal bilingual infants
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01943
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01943
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Infants, Bilingualism, Deaf, Sign Language, Face Processing, Eye-tracking, Bimodal Bilingualism, Visual Attention
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Psychology and Human Development
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10057790
Downloads since deposit
73Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item