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The nature of sustainable energy access transitions: realities and possibilities for Lagos, Nigeria

Eludoyin, Elusiyan Olufemi; (2018) The nature of sustainable energy access transitions: realities and possibilities for Lagos, Nigeria. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

This thesis is an investigation, both theoretical and empirical, into how the developing country energy poor can sustainably transition to modern energy services. This question is at the forefront of global issues as signified with Sustainable Development Goal 7 (SDG7); which includes the target of ensuring universal energy access for all. Global statistics on energy poverty show that after more than 50 years of experience, limited progress has been achieved in providing the unserved with modern energy services. A conceptual framework is developed to graphically explain different kinds of household transitions as related to sustainability; drawing on empirical evidence, and theories of household energy transitions in developing countries, consumer decision–making, and sustainable livelihoods. Six months of field research conducted in two stages is undertaken in an interesting case from Lagos, Nigeria, with the aim of understanding the existence and scope of the drivers of household energy use, change, and sustainability. The case provides evidence to suggest that sustainable transitions take place when an accessible modern energy form is deemed a necessity because the traditional alternative is no longer accessible, under strong influence by developments in a household’s organisation of daily life. The Long–range Energy Alternatives Planning tool (LEAP) was used to develop an innovative model of household energy demand for Lagos state to explore medium to long term transition possibilities. Results suggest, among others, that energy access should prioritise the facilitation of energy supply that can alleviate the need for energy stacking, because energy stacking can lead to unintended policy outcomes and wasted resources. The thesis concludes that if SDG7 desires to displace traditional energy services, then as opposed to using modern energy to change people’s lives, the international community needs to change people’s lives to use modern energy services.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: The nature of sustainable energy access transitions: realities and possibilities for Lagos, Nigeria
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: One photograph has been redacted in ethesis.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment > Bartlett School Env, Energy and Resources
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10057177
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