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Trends in Hospital Admissions for Nonfatal Adversity-Related Injury Among Youths in England, 2002-2016

Blackburn, RM; Herbert, A; Wijlaars, L; Gilbert, R; (2018) Trends in Hospital Admissions for Nonfatal Adversity-Related Injury Among Youths in England, 2002-2016. JAMA Pediatrics E1-E3. 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.2516. (In press).

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Abstract

Recent increases in health care contacts for self-inflicted injury have been reported for females but not for males in the United States and England.1,2 In the United States, rates of emergency department admissions for nonfatal self-inflicted injury increased among females aged 10 to 19 years from 2009 to 2015 and among females aged 15 to 19 years from 2008 to 2015.1 In England, annual incidence rates of self-inflicted injury in primary care increased from 2011 to 2014 for females aged 13 to 16 years.2 Four percent of all males and females aged 10 to 19 years have had an emergency hospital admission with a nonfatal adversity-related injury (ARI), reflecting mutually exclusive groups of self-inflicted injuries (coded as intentional self-harm or self-poisoning), injury admissions related to drug and alcohol use (excluding intentional alcohol or drug self-poisoning), or violence.3 Increasing rates of ARIs in England among girls, but not boys, have been previously reported but not for older adolescents (aged 20-24 years) or for recent years.4 We analyzed temporal trends in nonfatal ARI admissions overall and for self-inflicted injury among young people in England.

Type: Article
Title: Trends in Hospital Admissions for Nonfatal Adversity-Related Injury Among Youths in England, 2002-2016
DOI: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.2516
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.2516
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10056355
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