UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

The influence of the descending pain modulatory system on infant pain-related brain activity

Goksan, S; Baxter, L; Moultrie, F; Duff, E; Hathway, G; Hartley, C; Tracey, I; (2018) The influence of the descending pain modulatory system on infant pain-related brain activity. eLife , 7 , Article e37125. 10.7554/eLife.37125. Green open access

[thumbnail of elife-37125-v1.pdf]
Preview
Text
elife-37125-v1.pdf - Published Version

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

The descending pain modulatory system (DPMS) constitutes a network of widely distributed brain regions whose integrated function is essential for effective modulation of sensory input to the central nervous system and behavioural responses to pain. Animal studies demonstrate that young rodents have an immature DPMS, but comparable studies have not been conducted in human infants. In Goksan et al. (2015) we used functional MRI (fMRI) to show that pain-related brain activity in newborn infants is similar to that observed in adults. Here, we investigated whether the functional network connectivity strength across the infant DPMS influences the magnitude of this brain activity. FMRI scans were collected while mild mechanical noxious stimulation was applied to the infant’s foot. Greater pre-stimulus functional network connectivity across the DPMS was significantly associated with lower noxious-evoked brain activity (p = 0.0004, r = -0.86, n = 13), suggesting that in newborn infants the DPMS may regulate the magnitude of noxious-evoked brain activity.

Type: Article
Title: The influence of the descending pain modulatory system on infant pain-related brain activity
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.7554/eLife.37125
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.37125.001
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © Goksan et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Culture, Communication and Media
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10055964
Downloads since deposit
68Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item