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Scaling-up camera traps: monitoring the planet's biodiversity with networks of remote sensors

Steenweg, R; Hebblewhite, M; Kays, R; Ahumada, J; Fisher, JT; Burton, C; Townsend, SE; ... Rich, LN; + view all (2016) Scaling-up camera traps: monitoring the planet's biodiversity with networks of remote sensors. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment , 15 (1) pp. 26-34. 10.1002/fee.1448. Green open access

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Abstract

Countries committed to implementing the Convention on Biological Diversity's 2011–2020 strategic plan need effective tools to monitor global trends in biodiversity. Remote cameras are a rapidly growing technology that has great potential to transform global monitoring for terrestrial biodiversity and can be an important contributor to the call for measuring Essential Biodiversity Variables. Recent advances in camera technology and methods enable researchers to estimate changes in abundance and distribution for entire communities of animals and to identify global drivers of biodiversity trends. We suggest that interconnected networks of remote cameras will soon monitor biodiversity at a global scale, help answer pressing ecological questions, and guide conservation policy. This global network will require greater collaboration among remote‐camera studies and citizen scientists, including standardized metadata, shared protocols, and security measures to protect records about sensitive species. With modest investment in infrastructure, and continued innovation, synthesis, and collaboration, we envision a global network of remote cameras that not only provides real‐time biodiversity data but also serves to connect people with nature.

Type: Article
Title: Scaling-up camera traps: monitoring the planet's biodiversity with networks of remote sensors
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/fee.1448
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/fee.1448
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Ecology, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Sciences & Ecology, CAPTURE-RECAPTURE MODELS, FOREST MAMMALS, GRIZZLY BEARS, POPULATIONS, COMMUNITY, PROGRAM, DENSITY, PERSISTENCE, DIVERSITY, INFERENCE
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Genetics, Evolution and Environment
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10055599
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