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The status of CMV as a human pathogen.

Griffiths, PD; Grundy, JE; (1988) The status of CMV as a human pathogen. Epidemiol Infect , 100 (1) 1 - 15. 10.1017/S095026880006550X. Green open access

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Abstract

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common infectious agent which is well adapted to its host. Following primary infection, which is almost always asymptomatic in people with normal immunity, the virus establishes latency at sites which are unknown. The virus is probably maintained in this latent state by immune surveillance mechanisms since immunosuppression frequently leads to reactivation of virus. Cytomegalovirus has been identified in most anatomical areas of the human body. The aim of this article is to define criteria for pathogenicity so that clinical and experimental data can be reviewed to determine if CMV is likely to cause disease at these various clinical sites. Thus, patients have been shown to die frequently with CMV but do they die from it?

Type: Article
Title: The status of CMV as a human pathogen.
Location: ENGLAND
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S095026880006550X
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S095026880006550X
Language: English
Additional information: PMCID: PMC2249212 © 1988 Cambridge University Press
Keywords: Adult, Animals, Cytomegalovirus, Cytomegalovirus Infections, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Immune Tolerance, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Oncogenes, Syndrome
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1005536
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