UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Who gains more: Experts or novices? The benefits of interaction under numerical uncertainty

Sella, F; Blakey, R; Bang, D; Bahrami, B; Kadosh, RC; (2018) Who gains more: Experts or novices? The benefits of interaction under numerical uncertainty. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance , 44 (8) pp. 1228-1239. 10.1037/xhp0000526. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
WhoGainsMore_2Dec.pdf - Accepted version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Interacting to reach a shared decision is an omnipresent component of human collaboration. We explored the interaction between dyads of individuals with different levels of expertise. The members of the dyads completed a number line task privately, jointly and privately again. In the joint condition, dyad members shared their private estimates and then negotiated a joint estimate. Both dyad members averaged their private individual estimates to determine joint estimates, thereby showing a strong equality bias. Their performance in the joint condition exceeded the performance of the dyad’s best estimator, demonstrating interaction benefit, only when the dyad members had similar levels of expertise and when the averaged dyad performance was sufficiently accurate. At the end of the task, participants rated their level and their partner’s level of competence. Participants were accurate in classifying themselves as the expert or the novice within the dyad. Nevertheless, novices tended to overestimate their ability as they admitted to being less competent but only slightly worse than their expert partner. Experts, instead, believed themselves to be more competent but were humble and considered their performance only marginally better than their partner’s. Overall, these results have important implications for settings in which people with different levels of expertise interact.

Type: Article
Title: Who gains more: Experts or novices? The benefits of interaction under numerical uncertainty
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1037/xhp0000526
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xhp0000526
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10054315
Downloads since deposit
87Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item