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Examining the Role of Science in the Courtroom: Admissibility and reliability of forensic science

Hamirani, M; Dror, I; Morgan, RM; (2018) Examining the Role of Science in the Courtroom: Admissibility and reliability of forensic science. Albany Law Review , 81 (3) pp. 975-994. (In press).

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Abstract

There has been an increase in the recognition of the role of human cognition within the field of forensic science. This has entailed a growing understanding of the limitations and vulnerabilities of human decision-making when making decisions under conditions of uncertainty, and how these may impact the admissibility and reliability of forensic science. These often occur as a result of motivational or cognitive biases, and this paper will discuss how they may influence every stage of the investigation. The lack of a scientific foundation behind many of the methods used to analyze and communicate the value of evidence is also reviewed. It is important to address these issues as forensic science plays a much wider role within society.

Type: Article
Title: Examining the Role of Science in the Courtroom: Admissibility and reliability of forensic science
Publisher version: http://www.albanylawreview.org/issues/Pages/issues...
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Security and Crime Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10054166
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