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Early vascular damage from smoking and alcohol in teenage years: The ALSPAC study

Charakida, M; Georgiopoulos, G; Dangardt, F; Chiesa, ST; Hughes, AD; Rapala, A; Davey Smith, G; ... Deanfield, JE; + view all (2019) Early vascular damage from smoking and alcohol in teenage years: The ALSPAC study. European Heart Journal , 40 (4) pp. 345-353. 10.1093/eurheartj/ehy524. Green open access

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Abstract

AIMS: To determine the impact of smoking and alcohol exposure during adolescence on arterial stiffness at 17 years. METHODS AND RESULTS: Smoking and alcohol use were assessed by questionnaires at 13, 15, and 17 years in 1266 participants (425 males and 841 females) from the ALSPAC study. Smoking status (smokers and non-smoker) and intensity (‘high’ ≥100, ‘moderate’ 20–99, and ‘low or never’ <20 cigarettes in lifetime) were ascertained. Participants were classified by frequency (low or high) and intensity of drinking [light (LI <2), medium (MI 3–9), and heavy (HI >10 drinks on a typical drinking day)]. Carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was assessed at 17 years [mean ± standard deviation and/or mean difference (95% confidence intervals)]. Current smokers had higher PWV compared with non-smokers (P = 0.003). Higher smoking exposure was associated with higher PWV compared with non-smokers [5.81 ± 0.725 vs. 5.71 ± 0.677 m/s, mean adjusted difference 0.211 (0.087–0.334) m/s, P = 0.001]. Participants who stopped smoking had similar PWV to never smokers (P = 0.160). High-intensity drinkers had increased PWV [HI 5.85 ± 0.8 vs. LI 5.67 ± 0.604 m/s, mean adjusted difference 0.266 (0.055–0.476) m/s, P = 0.013]. There was an additive effect of smoking intensity and alcohol intensity, so that ‘high’ smokers who were also HI drinkers had higher PWV compared with never-smokers and LI drinkers [mean adjusted increase 0.603 (0.229–0.978) m/s, P = 0.002]. CONCLUSION: Smoking exposure even at low levels and intensity of alcohol use were associated individually and together with increased arterial stiffness. Public health strategies need to prevent adoption of these habits in adolescence to preserve or restore arterial health.

Type: Article
Title: Early vascular damage from smoking and alcohol in teenage years: The ALSPAC study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehy524
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehy524
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Smoking, Alcohol, Arterial stiffness, Adolescence
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Clinical Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10053850
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