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Effect of dexamethasone exposure on the neonatal unit on the school age lung function of children born very prematurely

Harris, C; Crichton, S; Zivanovic, S; Lunt, A; Calvert, S; Marlow, N; Peacock, JL; (2018) Effect of dexamethasone exposure on the neonatal unit on the school age lung function of children born very prematurely. PLoS One , 13 (7) , Article e0200243. 10.1371/journal.pone.0200243. Green open access

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the impact of postnatal dexamethasone treatment on the neonatal unit on the school age lung function of very prematurely born children. Children born prior to 29 weeks of gestational age had been entered into a randomised trial of two methods of neonatal ventilation (United Kingdom Oscillation Study). They had comprehensive lung function measurements at 11 to 14 years of age. One hundred and seventy-nine children born at a mean gestational age of 26.9 (range 23–28) weeks were assessed at 11 to 14 years; 50 had received postnatal dexamethasone. Forced expiratory flow at 75% (FEF75), 50%, 25% and 25–75% of the expired vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, peak expiratory flow and forced vital capacity and lung volumes including total lung capacity and residual volume were assessed. Lung function outcomes were compared between children who had and had not been exposed to dexamethasone after adjustment for neonatal factors using linear mixed effects regression. After adjustment for confounders all the mean spirometry results were between 0.38 and 0.87 standard deviations lower in those exposed to dexamethasone compared to the unexposed. For example, the mean FEF75z-score was 0.53 lower (95% CI 0.21 to 0.85). The mean lung function was lower as the number of courses of dexamethasone increased. In conclusion, postnatal dexamethasone exposure was associated with lower mean lung function at school age in children born extremely prematurely. Our results suggest the larger the cumulative dose the greater the adverse effect on lung function at follow-up.

Type: Article
Title: Effect of dexamethasone exposure on the neonatal unit on the school age lung function of children born very prematurely
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0200243
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0200243
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright: © 2018 Harris et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology > MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health > Neonatology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10053395
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