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Two strategies to enhance ungual drug permeation from UV-cured films: incomplete polymerisation to increase drug release and incorporation of chemical enhancers

Kerai, LV; Bardés, J; Hilton, S; Murdan, S; (2018) Two strategies to enhance ungual drug permeation from UV-cured films: incomplete polymerisation to increase drug release and incorporation of chemical enhancers. European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences , 123 pp. 217-227. 10.1016/j.ejps.2018.07.049. Green open access

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Abstract

UV-curable gels, which polymerise into long-lasting films upon exposure to UVA, have been identified as potential topical drug carriers for the treatment of nail diseases. Limitations of such films include incomplete drug release and low ungual drug permeation. The aim of the work herein was therefore to investigate two strategies, namely: (1) increasing drug release from the film, and (2) increasing nailplate permeability, with the ultimate goal of enhancing ungual drug permeation. To increase drug release via Strategy 1, a UV-LED lamp (whose emitted light was suboptimal for gel polymerisation) was used, and it was hypothesised that such a lamp would result in films that are less polymerised/cross-linked and where the drugs are less ‘trapped’. Indeed, the suboptimal lamp influenced polymerisation, such that the films were thinner, had lower glass transition temperatures and enabled a slightly greater (by 15%) drug release of one of the two drugs tested. However, the greater drug release had only a modest impact on ungual drug permeation. To evaluate Strategy 2, i.e. increase nailplate permeability, chemical ungual enhancers, 2-mercaptoethanol (ME), 2-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP), PEG 200 and water were incorporated within the UV-cured films. These chemicals caused increased ungual drug permeation, with ME showing the greatest (by 140%), and water showing the least (by 20%) increase in the amount of drug permeated by day 30. Surprisingly, these chemicals also caused increased drug release from the films, with ME once again having the greatest effect (by 51%) and water the least effect (by 12%). It seems that these chemicals were increasing ungual drug permeation via their influence on drug release (i.e. via their impact on the film) as well as via their influence on the nail itself. We conclude that, of the two strategies tested, the second strategy proved to be more successful at enhancing ungual drug permeation. increasing drug release from the film, and (2) increasing nailplate permeability, with the ultimate goal of enhancing ungual drug permeation. To increase drug release via Strategy 1, a UV-LED lamp (whose emitted light was suboptimal for gel polymerisation) was used, and it was hypothesised that such a lamp would result in films that are less polymerised/cross-linked and where the drugs are less 'trapped'. Indeed, the suboptimal lamp influenced polymerisation, such that the films were thinner, had lower glass transition temperatures and enabled a slightly greater (by 15%) drug release of one of the two drugs tested. However, the greater drug release had only a modest impact on ungual drug permeation. To evaluate Strategy 2, i.e. increase nailplate permeability, chemical ungual enhancers, 2-mercaptoethanol (ME), 2-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP), PEG 200 and water were incorporated within the UVcured films. These chemicals caused increased ungual drug permeation, with ME showing the greatest (by 140%), and water showing the least (by 20%) increase in the amount of drug permeated by day 30. Surprisingly, these chemicals also caused increased drug release from the films, with ME once again having the greatest effect (by 51%) and water the least effect (by 12%). It seems that these chemicals were increasing ungual drug permeation via their influence on drug release (i.e. via their impact on the film) as well as via their influence on the nail itself. We conclude that, of the two strategies tested, the second strategy proved to be more successful at enhancing ungual drug permeation.

Type: Article
Title: Two strategies to enhance ungual drug permeation from UV-cured films: incomplete polymerisation to increase drug release and incorporation of chemical enhancers
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.ejps.2018.07.049
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejps.2018.07.049
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: nail, ungual, drug release, drug permeation, UV-curable gels, topical, UV LED lamp
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Pharma and Bio Chemistry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Pharmaceutics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10053118
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