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Input effects across domains: The case of Greek subjects in child heritage language

Daskalaki, E; Chondrogianni, V; Blom, E; Argyri, F; Paradis, J; (2019) Input effects across domains: The case of Greek subjects in child heritage language. Second Language Research , 35 (3) pp. 421-445. 10.1177/0267658318787231. Green open access

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Abstract

A recurring question in the literature of heritage language acquisition, and more generally of bilingual acquisition, is whether all linguistic domains are sensitive to input reduction and to cross-linguistic influence and to what extent. According to the Interface Hypothesis, morphosyntactic phenomena regulated by discourse–pragmatic conditions are more likely to lead to non-native outcomes than strictly syntactic aspects of the language (Sorace, 2011). To test this hypothesis, we examined subject realization and placement in Greek–English bilingual children learning Greek as a heritage language in North America and investigated whether the amount of heritage language use can predict their performance in syntax–discourse and narrow syntactic contexts. Results indicated two deviations from the Interface Hypothesis: First, subject realization (a syntax–discourse phenomenon) was found to be largely unproblematic. Second, subject placement was affected not only in syntax–discourse structures but also in narrow syntactic structures, though to a lesser degree, suggesting that the association between the interface status of subject placement and its sensitivity to heritage language use among children heritage speakers is gradient rather than categorical.

Type: Article
Title: Input effects across domains: The case of Greek subjects in child heritage language
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/0267658318787231
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1177/0267658318787231
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Child heritage language acquisition, heritage language use, input and output effect, Interface Hypothesis, narrow syntax, subject use in Greek, syntax–discourse interface
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Culture, Communication and Media
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10052470
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