UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Low Gain Servo Control During the Kohnstamm Phenomenon Reveals Dissociation Between Low-Level Control Mechanisms for Involuntary vs. Voluntary Arm Movements

De Havas, J; Ito, S; Haggard, P; Gomi, H; (2018) Low Gain Servo Control During the Kohnstamm Phenomenon Reveals Dissociation Between Low-Level Control Mechanisms for Involuntary vs. Voluntary Arm Movements. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience , 12 , Article 113. 10.3389/fnbeh.2018.00113. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
fnbeh-12-00113.pdf - Published version

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

The Kohnstamm phenomenon is a prolonged involuntary aftercontraction following a sustained voluntary isometric muscle contraction. The control principles of the Kohnstamm have been investigated using mechanical perturbations, but previous studies could not dissociate sensorimotor responses to perturbation from effects of gravity. We induced a horizontal, gravity-independent Kohnstamm movement around the shoulder joint, and applied resistive or assistive torques of 0.5 Nm after 20◦ angular displacement. A No perturbation control condition was included. Further, participants made velocity-matched voluntary movements, with or without similar perturbations, yielding a 2 × 3 factorial design. Resistive perturbations produced an increase in agonist electromyography (EMG), in both Kohnstamm and voluntary movements, while assistive perturbations produced a decrease. While overall Kohnstamm EMGs were greater than voluntary EMGs, the EMG responses to perturbation, when expressed as a percentage of unperturbed EMG activity, were significantly smaller during Kohnstamm movements than during voluntary movements. The results suggest that the Kohnstamm aftercontraction involves a central drive, coupled with low-gain servo control by a negative feedback loop between afferent input and a central motor command. The combination of strong efferent drive with low reflex gain may characterize involuntary control of postural muscles. Our results question traditional accounts involving purely reflexive mechanisms of postural maintenance. They also question existing high-gain, peripheral accounts of the Kohnstamm phenomenon, as well as accounts involving a central adaptation interacting with muscle receptors via a positive force feedback loop.

Type: Article
Title: Low Gain Servo Control During the Kohnstamm Phenomenon Reveals Dissociation Between Low-Level Control Mechanisms for Involuntary vs. Voluntary Arm Movements
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fnbeh.2018.00113
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2018.00113
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2018 De Havas, Ito, Haggard and Gomi. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Keywords: kohnstamm phenomenon, involuntary movement, aftercontraction, servo-control, voluntary movement, muscle afferents, electromyography
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10051818
Downloads since deposit
24Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item