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Systematic review of infant and young child complementary feeding practices in South Asian families: the India perspective

Manikam, L; Prasad, A; Dharmaratnam, A; Moen, C; Robinson, A; Light, A; Ahmed, S; ... Lakhanpaul, M; + view all (2018) Systematic review of infant and young child complementary feeding practices in South Asian families: the India perspective. Public Health Nutrition , 21 (4) pp. 637-654. 10.1017/S136898001700297X. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Suboptimal nutrition among children remains a problem among South Asian (SA) families. Appropriate complementary feeding (CF) practices can greatly reduce this risk. Thus, we undertook a systematic review of studies assessing CF (timing, dietary diversity, meal frequency and influencing factors) in children aged <2 years in India. DESIGN: Searches between January 2000 and June 2016 in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Global Health, Web of Science, OVID Maternity & Infant Care, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, BanglaJOL, POPLINE and WHO Global Health Library. Eligibility criteria: primary research on CF practices in SA children aged 0-2 years and/or their families. Search terms: 'children', 'feeding' and 'Asians' and derivatives. Two researchers undertook study selection, data extraction and quality appraisal (EPPI-Centre Weight of Evidence). RESULTS: From 45 712 abstracts screened, sixty-four cross-sectional, seven cohort, one qualitative and one case-control studies were included. Despite adopting the WHO Infant and Young Child Feeding guidelines, suboptimal CF practices were found in all studies. In twenty-nine of fifty-nine studies, CF was introduced between 6 and 9 months, with eight studies finding minimum dietary diversity was achieved in 6-33 %, and ten of seventeen studies noting minimum meal frequency in only 25-50 % of the study populations. Influencing factors included cultural influences, poor knowledge on appropriate CF practices and parental educational status. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first systematic review to evaluate CF practices in SA in India. Campaigns to change health and nutrition behaviour and revision of nationwide child health nutrition programmes are needed to meet the substantial unmet needs of these children.

Type: Article
Title: Systematic review of infant and young child complementary feeding practices in South Asian families: the India perspective
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S136898001700297X
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S136898001700297X
Language: English
Additional information: These versions are the author accepted manuscript and the version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Child, Complementary feeding, India, Infant, Nutrition
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10051593
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