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Genetic background may contribute to the latitude-dependent prevalence of dermatomyositis and anti-TIF1-γ autoantibodies in adult patients with myositis

Parkes, JE; Rothwell, S; Oldroyd, A; Chinoy, H; Lamb, JA; Lundberg, IE; Miller, FW; ... Betteridge, ZE; + view all (2018) Genetic background may contribute to the latitude-dependent prevalence of dermatomyositis and anti-TIF1-γ autoantibodies in adult patients with myositis. Arthritis Research and Therapy , 20 , Article 117. 10.1186/s13075-018-1617-9. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: The prevalence of dermatomyositis (DM) versus DM and polymyositis (PM) combined has been shown to be negatively associated with latitude. This observation has been attributed to increasing exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light towards the equator. In this study, we investigated whether differing genetic background in populations could contribute to this distribution of DM. Methods: Case data derived from the MYOGEN (Myositis Genetics Consortium) Immunochip study (n = 1769) were used to model the association of DM prevalence and DM-specific autoantibodies with latitude. Control data (n = 9911) were used to model the relationship of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) associated with DM autoantibodies and DM or PM single-nucleotide polymorphisms (suggestive significance in the Immunochip project, P < 2.25 × 10- 5) in healthy control subjects with latitude. All variables were analysed against latitude using ordered logistic regression, adjusted for sex. Results: The prevalence of DM, as a proportion of DM and PM combined, and the presence of anti-transcription intermediary factor 1 (anti-TIF1-γ) autoantibodies were both significantly negatively associated with latitude (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.95-0.98, P < 0.001; and OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.92-0.99, P = 0.004, respectively). HLA alleles significantly associated with anti-Mi-2 and anti-TIF1-γ autoantibodies also were strongly negatively associated with latitude (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.96-0.98, P < 0.001 and OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99, P < 0.001, respectively). The frequency of five PM- or DM-associated SNPs showed a significant association with latitude (P < 0.05), and the direction of four of these associations was consistent with the latitude associations of the clinical phenotypes. Conclusions: These results lend some support to the hypothesis that genetic background, in addition to UV exposure, may contribute to the distribution of DM.

Type: Article
Title: Genetic background may contribute to the latitude-dependent prevalence of dermatomyositis and anti-TIF1-γ autoantibodies in adult patients with myositis
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13075-018-1617-9
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1186/s13075-018-1617-9
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s). 2018 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Dermatomyositis, Polymyositis, Anti-TIF1-γ, Anti-Mi-2, Latitude, Ultraviolet light
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10051194
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