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Reducing sound and light exposure to improve sleep on the adult intensive care unit: An inclusive narrative review

Bion, V; Lowe, AS; Puthucheary, Z; Montgomery, H; (2018) Reducing sound and light exposure to improve sleep on the adult intensive care unit: An inclusive narrative review. Journal of the Intensive Care Society , 19 (2) pp. 138-146. 10.1177/1751143717740803. Green open access

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Abstract

Purpose: Sleep disturbance is common in intensive care units. It is associated with detrimental psychological impacts and has potential to worsen outcome. Irregular exposure to sound and light may disrupt circadian rhythm and cause frequent arousals from sleep. We sought to review the efficacy of environmental interventions to reduce sound and light exposure with the aim of improving patient sleep on adult intensive care units. Methods: We searched both PubMed (1966-30 May 2017) and Embase (1974-30 May 2017) for all relevant human (adult) studies and meta-analyses published in English using search terms ((intensive care OR critical care), AND (sleep OR sleep disorders), AND (light OR noise OR sound)). Bibliographies were explored. Articles were included if reporting change in patient sleep in response to an intervention to reduce disruptive intensive care unit sound /light exposure. Results: Fifteen studies were identified. Nine assessed mechanical interventions, four of which used polysomnography to assess sleep. Five studies looked at environmental measures to facilitate sleep and a further two (one already included as assessing a mechanical intervention) studied the use of sound to promote sleep. Most studies found a positive impact of the intervention on sleep. However, few studies used objective sleep assessments, sample sizes were small, methodologies sometimes imperfect and analysis limited. Data are substantially derived from specialist (neurosurgical, post-operative, cardiothoracic and cardiological) centres. Patients were often at the 'less sick' end of the spectrum in a variety of settings (open ward beds or side rooms). Conclusions: Simple measures to reduce intensive care unit patient sound/light exposure appear effective. However, larger and more inclusive high-quality studies are required in order to identify the measures most effective in different patient groups and any impacts on outcome.

Type: Article
Title: Reducing sound and light exposure to improve sleep on the adult intensive care unit: An inclusive narrative review
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/1751143717740803
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01540-17
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Sleep, intensive care, light, noise, sound
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Internal Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10050998
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