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Visual Acuity in Late Adolescence and Future Psychosis Risk in a Cohort of 1 Million Men

Hayes, JF; Picot, S; Osborn, DPJ; Lewis, G; Dalman, C; Lundin, A; (2019) Visual Acuity in Late Adolescence and Future Psychosis Risk in a Cohort of 1 Million Men. Schizophrenia Bulletin , 45 (3) pp. 571-578. 10.1093/schbul/sby084. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: We aimed to determine whether late adolescent visual impairment is associated with later psychosis. // Methods: We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of Swedish male military conscripts aged 18 or 19 years from January 1, 1974, through December 31, 1997 (N = 1140710). At conscription, uncorrected and optometry-lens-corrected distance visual acuity was measured. Participants were then followed up to see if they received an inpatient diagnosis of non-affective psychotic disorder, including schizophrenia (N = 10769). Multivariable Cox modeling was used to estimate differences between groups. // Results: After adjustment for confounders, those with severe impairment before optical correction in their best eye (decimal fraction <0.3) had an increased psychosis rate compared to those with normal uncorrected vision (decimal fraction 1.0) (hazard ratio [HR] 1.26, 95% CI 1.16–1.37). Larger interocular visual acuity difference was associated with an increased psychosis rate (adjusted HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.37–1.63 in those with differences >0.5 compared to those with no between eye acuity difference). Individuals with impaired vision that could not be corrected to normal with lenses had highest rates of psychosis (best eye adjusted HR 1.56; 95% CI 1.33–1.82), those with imperfect, but correctable vision also had elevated rates (best eye adjusted HR 1.21; 95% CI 1.15–1.28). Individuals with visual impairment had higher rates of psychosis than their full siblings with normal vision (adjusted HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.07–1.35). // Conclusions: Impaired visual acuity is associated with non-affective psychosis. Visual impairment as a phenotype in psychosis requires further consideration.

Type: Article
Title: Visual Acuity in Late Adolescence and Future Psychosis Risk in a Cohort of 1 Million Men
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/schbul/sby084
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sby084
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: eyesight, vision, schizophrenia, sibling-design
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10050950
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