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Engagement features judged by excessive drinkers as most important to include in smartphone applications for alcohol reduction: A mixed-methods study

Perski, O; Baretta, D; Blandford, A; West, R; Michie, S; (2018) Engagement features judged by excessive drinkers as most important to include in smartphone applications for alcohol reduction: A mixed-methods study. Digital Health , 4 pp. 1-15. 10.1177/2055207618785841. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Engagement with smartphone applications (apps) for alcohol reduction is necessary for effectiveness. This study explored 1) the features that are ranked as most important for engagement by excessive drinkers and 2) why particular features are judged to be more important for engagement than others. METHODS: Two studies were conducted in parallel. The first was a focus group study with adult excessive drinkers, interested in reducing alcohol consumption using an app (Ngroups = 3). Participants individually ranked their top 10 features from a pre-specified list and subsequently discussed their rankings. The second was an online study with a new sample (N = 132). Rankings were analysed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) to assess level of agreement between raters for each study. Qualitative data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: There was low agreement between participants in their rankings, both in the focus groups (ICC = 0.15, 95% CI = 0.03-0.38) and the online sample (ICC = 0.11, 95% CI = 0.06-0.23). ‘Personalisation’, ‘control features’ and ‘interactive features’ were most highly ranked in the focus groups. These were expected to elicit a sense of benefit and usefulness, adaptability, provide motivational support or spark users’ interest. Results from the online study partly corroborated these findings. CONCLUSION: There was little agreement between participants, but on average, the features judged to be most important for inclusion in smartphone apps for alcohol reduction were personalisation, interactive features and control features. Tailoring on users’ underlying psychological needs may promote engagement with alcohol reduction apps.

Type: Article
Title: Engagement features judged by excessive drinkers as most important to include in smartphone applications for alcohol reduction: A mixed-methods study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/2055207618785841
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177/2055207618785841
Language: English
Additional information: Creative Commons CC-BY: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
Keywords: Alcohol reduction, behaviour change, digital health, engagement, mHealth, mixed-methods, smartphone apps, focus groups
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10050382
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